Blog

Happy March 8 International Women’s Day

“Everything in the world is the work of women. If our women want to be the true mothers of the nation, they should try to be more enlightened and virtuous than our men.”
-Mustafa Kemal Atatürk-

In 1908, an important turning point occurred in New York when women textile workers protested in New York demanding better working conditions and the story of women began.

March 8 was officially recognized by the United Nations in 1977. Celebrated for 47 years on the same day, this special day aims to raise awareness of women’s struggle for equality, justice and freedom in all areas of society. Today, women who are still involved in all areas of life and play an active role continue their struggle.

If we look at the women who have had an impact on our current lives with what they have done in completely different fields from the past to the present:

Emily Murphy–Canada’s first woman judge, she helped to change the law in the country which stated that women were not considered human beings.

Eleanor Roosevelt–The world’s first First Lady who introduced the International Declaration of Human Rights to the United Nations General Assembly and secured its adoption.

Ada Lovelace- Her notes on machinery include the first algorithm written to be processed by a computer. It is therefore generally believed that she was the world’s first computer programmer.

Hedy Lamarr– Together with George Antheil, a composer and inventor, they invented and patented the frequency hopping spread spectrum for use in radio-guided torpedoes.

Sabiha Rıfat (Ecebilge) Gürayman— She was one of the first female civil engineers in Turkey and the first female volleyball player of Fenerbahçe Sports Club. The fact that a woman engineer took charge in the construction of Anıtkabir aroused global interest and the Greek Prime Minister Venizelos congratulated her by saying “For the first time in my life I see a woman in charge of such a big work. I congratulate you“. She took part in the construction of a bridge at the 86th kilometer of the Ankara-Beypazarı highway and became “the first woman engineer to build a bridge in Anatolia“.

Sabiha Gökçen–World’s first female fighter pilot and the first Turkish woman pilot.

Marie Curie– A pioneer in the field of radioactivity, Curie was the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize for her pioneering research, and the first scientist to receive the prize twice.

Yvonne Brill– is responsible for inventing the Electrothermal Hydrazine Thruster, a fuel-efficient rocket booster that keeps today’s satellites in orbit, and holds a patent for her invention.

Anne Frank– is an iconic figure of the Holocaust in Germany. At the age of 13, she wrote diaries in which she exposed Nazi persecution to the world.

Catherine the Great– During the reign of the great tsarina who made Russia the greatest power of the 18th century, hundreds of thousands of square kilometers of territory were conquered and the solid foundations of the Russian Empire were laid in her time and with her contributions.

In 1908, an important turning point occurred when women textile workers in New York protested for better working conditions and the story of women began.

March 8 was officially recognized by the United Nations in 1977. Celebrated for 47 years on the same day, this special day aims to raise awareness of women’s struggle for equality, justice and freedom in all areas of society. Today, women who still take part in all areas of life and play an active role continue their struggle.

If we look at the women who have influenced our current lives with what they have done in completely different fields from past to present:

Emily Murphy– Canada’s first woman judge, she helped change the country’s law that women are not considered human beings.

Eleanor Roosevelt–The world’s first First Lady who introduced the International Declaration of Human Rights to the United Nations General Assembly and secured its adoption.

Ada Lovelace- His notes on machinery include the first algorithm written to be processed by a computer. He is therefore generally considered to be the world’s first computer programmer.

Hedy Lamarr– Together with George Antheil, a composer and inventor, they invented and patented the frequency hopping spread spectrum for use in radio-guided torpedoes.

Sabiha Rıfat (Ecebilge) Gürayman— She was one of the first female civil engineers in Turkey and the first female volleyball player of Fenerbahçe Sports Club. The fact that a woman engineer took charge in the construction of Anıtkabir aroused global interest and the Greek Prime Minister Venizelos congratulated her by saying “For the first time in my life I see a woman in charge of such a big work. I congratulate you“. She took part in the construction of the bridge built at the 86th kilometer of the Ankara-Beypazarı highway and earned the title of “The first woman engineer to build a bridge in Anatolia“.

Sabiha Gökçen– was the world’s first female fighter pilot and the first Turkish woman pilot.

Marie Curie– A pioneer in the field of radioactivity, Curie was the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize for her pioneering research, and the first scientist to receive the prize twice.

Yvonne Brill– is responsible for inventing the Electrothermal Hydrazine Thruster, a fuel-efficient rocket booster that keeps today’s satellites in orbit, and holds a patent for her invention.

Anne Frank– is an iconic figure of the Holocaust in Germany. At the age of 13, she wrote diaries in which she exposed Nazi persecution to the world.

Catherine the Great– During the reign of the great tsarina who made Russia the greatest power of the 18th century, hundreds of thousands of square kilometers of territory were conquered and the solid foundations of the Russian Empire were laid in her time and with her contributions.

Rachel Carson– is an environmentally friendly scientist who started the world’s environmental movement with her book Silent Spring, proving the harmfulness of a pesticide called DDT and legally limiting the use of such chemicals that poison our world.

Grace Hopper– A computer scientist and US Navy officer, Hopper was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer and one of the developers of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. He was also one of the first users of the concept of cleaning a program from bugs, known in computer lingo as “debugging”. The American warship USS Hopper (DDG-70) was named after him.

Josephine Cochrane– built the first practical dishwasher in Shelbyville, Illinois in 1886 and was granted the patent for the dishwasher by Joel Houghton in 1886.

Barbara McClintock– Considered one of the world’s most important cytogeneticists, McClintock studied chromosomes and how they change during reproduction in maize, first mapping the genetics of maize. He won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of transposons.

Maria Mitchell– In 1847, with the help of a telescope, she discovered the comet known as “Miss Mitchell’s Comet”, for which she was awarded a gold medal by King Frederick VII of Denmark – an unusual and significant award for a woman at the time. Mitchell was the first American woman to be an astronomer by profession.

Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin– was a British scientist who was awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on vitamin B12, pioneered the technique of X-ray crystallography for determining the three-dimensional structure of biomolecules, and was the founder of the science branch called protein crystallography.

“If you give a woman the right shoes, she can conquer the world.” /Marilyn Monroe

Mary Somerville– was a science writer and polymath whose work in astronomy made her one of the first two female members of the Royal Astronomical Society, along with Caroline Herschel.

Mary Anning–  A fossil collector and paleontologist whose fossil discoveries and studies have made her one of the world’s most important scientists.

Maria Telkes–During her career she has received numerous awards and honors for her contributions in the field of solar energy and thermodynamics. In 1948 she was awarded the Silver Prize of the International Solar Energy Society and in 1969 she received the prestigious Eddington Medal of the International Astronomical Union.

Lillian Möller Gilbreth– was a pioneer in the field now known as industrial and organizational psychology, and the first American engineer to create a synthesis of psychology and scientific management.

And many more women.. Their place and contribution in this world we live in is an undeniable fact. If we want to build a better economy, a better society, a better world, we need to take steps and make rapid progress every day, not just one day, in education, awareness and solidarity so that women can exist in an equal, free and just environment and carry humanity forward.

We celebrate World Women’s Day for all our women who inspire and make a difference, and we want to remind them that we stand side by side in their struggle to create a world full of love, respect and equality. It is our responsibility to once again celebrate and remind the efforts of women who are the pioneers of progress and change.